Christmas in Australia – Aussie Jingle Bells in a Rusty Holden Ute

christmas-in-australia-aussie-jingle-bells-rusty-holden-ute

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to spend Christmas in Australia? Well, this article will give you a pretty good idea of what you’d be in for.

Share this article if you’re proud to be an Aussie! ..and proud about the way we spend Christmas together.

Aussies are renowned for being laid back and not taking life too seriously. That’s where the sayings: “She’ll be right” and “no worries” stem from. Australian’s have a knack for putting their own spin and twist on absolutely everything: Words, sayings, traditions, you name it; and Christmas is no exception.

We simply can’t do anything like everyone else. Everything about Australian culture is unique. For example: Words get shortened. Here are a few examples. You’ll need to learn some of them to be able to understand the lyrics of the Australian Christmas songs further down in the article.

  • A cuppa is a cup of tea.
  • Macca’s is short for McDonald’s
  • Arvo means afternoon; S’arvo means “THIS afternoon”.
  • Even the name of Australia is shortened to “Straya”
  • Football is “footy”.
  • Biscuit is biccy.
  • A chocolate is choccy.
  • A laptop is a lappy!
  • Definitely is defo, not to be confused with devo which means devastated.
  • A service station is a servo.
  • The postie drops your mail, the garbo picks up your rubbish and the muso plays music.
  • A taxi driver is called a cabbie, a bricklayer is a brickie.
  • Fires are put out by a firey and any injured are taken away by the “ambo’s” (ambulance drivers).

So, as you can see, no word, phrase, name or sentence is safe from Australian slang. Neither are Christmas songs. You might be wondering: “How much can a country change a Christmas song from its original meaning?”.

Well, here’s case example number one:

swagmanSwagman

Song: Aussie Jingle Bells in a rusty Holden Ute

Before you listen, you might need to know the definition of these words:

  • Bush = Regional area, otherwise known in other parts of the world as “the country”.
  • Ute = A utility vehicle; a pickup.
  • Thongs = IMPORTANT: This is not underwear. Thongs are what Americans call “flip flops”.
  • Beaut = “Beautiful”.
  • Holden = An automobile manufactured in Australia.
  • Swaggie: A labourer that travels from farm to farm by foot.

When it comes to Christmas songs, the same attitude prevails.

Aussie Jingle Bells in a rusty Holden Ute – Lyrics

Dashing through the bush,
in a rusty Holden Ute,
Kicking up the dust,
esky in the boot,
Kelpie by my side,
singing Christmas songs,
It’s Summer time and I am in
my singlet, shorts and thongs

Oh! Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way,
Christmas in Australia on a scorching summers day, Hey!
Jingle bells, jingle bells, Christmas time is beaut !,
Oh what fun it is to ride in a rusty Holden Ute.

Engine’s getting hot;
we dodge the kangaroos,
The swaggie climbs aboard,
he is welcome too.
All the family’s there,
sitting by the pool,
Christmas Day the Aussie way,
by the barbecue.

Oh! Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way,
Christmas in Australia on a scorching summers day, Hey!
Jingle bells, jingle bells, Christmas time is beaut!,
Oh what fun it is to ride in a rusty Holden Ute.

Come the afternoon,
Grandpa has a doze,
The kids and Uncle Bruce,
are swimming in their clothes.
The time comes ’round to go,
we take the family snap,
Pack the car and all shoot through,
before the washing up.

Oh! Jingle bells, jingle bells, jingle all the way,
Christmas in Australia on a scorching summers day, Hey!
Jingle bells, jingle bells, Christmas time is beaut!,
Oh what fun it is to ride in a rusty Holden Ute

Here are two more Christmas songs which demonstrate the Aussie Christmas spirit.

Song: Christmas in Australia:

The Aussie Christmas Song:

12 Things to know about an Australian Christmas:

  • Santa: You’ll often see Santa driving past houses in a fire engine, waving at the children, or handing out treats at a mall. Poor guy is usually pretty hot. It’s not unheard of to see Santa wearing a shorts and singlet version of his “costume”.
  • Holidays (15th Dec to 3rd Feb): It doesn’t matter where you go, it’s busy. The beach is packed, car parks are full, transport is overwhelmed as people are out and about, travelling all over the place. Many families go camping; usually on the water. A river or beach camping trip is common.
  • The lead up for Christmas seems to start earlier and earlier every year. You’ll star to see decorations, wrapping cards and signs on shops in November! October is not safe either!
  • Most Australian families travel from state to state to be with each other on Christmas day. Book your flights early!
  • Shopping: Be prepared for crazyness. That’s all I can say. Don’t bring small kids. Aussies love a bargain.
  • Australian’s love to decorate their houses with Christmas lights. Some streets are exclusively filled with lights and can attract lines of cars, bumper to bumper, which come to view the sights from all around.
  • Carols by candlelight. Australian’s love their Christmas carols and get together in their communities to sing Christmas carols on Christmas eve. The main events are broadcast on national TV (the telly, which mean TV).
  • Songs: Well, I think this article explains that one 🙂
  • Families often play sport together on Christmas day: Frisbee, cricket, footy, a swim or a surf.
  • Forget the turkey, in Australia we like to have a good BBQ. Ok web have roasts as well, but it doesn’t have to be turkey; although it can be!
  • Thousands of people are forced to evacuate their homes every year due to bushfires.
  • The average temperature is between 25-40 degrees Celsius (77-104). It can get in the high 40’s (117 farenheight).

Share this article if you’re proud to be an Aussie! ..and proud about the way we spend Christmas together.

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Article written by: Leonard Wass

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